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How much ganache?

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Hi, I’ve recently discovered ganache and have decided to use it for a wedding cake I’ve got to do (the client is providing the cakes and was going to provide ganache for the filling. I was previously going to do a buttercream crumb coat, but am glad I’ve realised ganache is the way forward!). I’ve done a practice and used 700g dark chocolate in a 1:1 ratio and had plenty for 8 and 6 inch rounds with one layer. I need to do 12, 9 and 6 rounds with two layers. Any idea how much chocolate I should use to make enough? I need to quote for her. Was wondering about 1800g or 2kg? thanks

asked May 20, 2012

5 Answers

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Hi,

Paul recommended 3 pints of cream to 6lbs of chocolate for three cakes. Hope this helps!

 

Paula

Customer Support

paula
200
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Thanks Paula. It sort of helps – it’s less cream but more choc than I was considering!  I’ve only done equal cream/choc before to try to keep the cost down a bit. Is there a reason for doubling the chocolate? Does it make it ‘keep’ better? I assume once finished the cake is ok for a while out of the fridge, despite the cream? (since sugarpaste doesn’t like the fridge!) The client is slightly concerned about hot weather and melting/seepage into the sugarpaste by using a ganache crumb coat.

Thanks

Rachel

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You could use mathematics to calculate what area you know you can already cover and what area you need to cover.  See http://www.mathsisfun.com/area.html.  I’ll work it out for you, get someone to check it, lol and get back to you.

jayess
737
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Thanks, I took a quick look and thought, I’ll need to think about that when the kids are in bed! I’ve been doing some research and think that doubling the chocolate to cream might help with preventing bacteria multiplying so I think I’ll do that and go with Paul’s quantities. She’s going to pay the extra cost anyway. I’ve put a separate question about fridges and hot days!

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Hi musicrach, have a look at http://math.about.com/library/blcirclecalculator.htm put in cake tin diameter in diameter and click on solve others.  Voila, up comes answers.

example (presuming your cake is 3″ deep)

6″ circumference 18.84 x 3 (cake depth) 56.52
area 28.26 x 2 56.52
total area covered   with 1 layer ganache 113.04 A
8″ circumference 25.12 x 3 (cake depth) 75.36
area 50.24 x 2 100.48
total area covered   with 1 layer ganache 175.84 B
6″ circumference 18.84 x 3 (cake depth) 56.52
area 28.26 x 3 84.78
total area covered with 2 layers ganache 141.30 C
9″ circumference 28.26 x 3 (cake depth) 84.78
area 63.585 x 3 190.76
total area covered   with 2 layers ganache 275.54 D
12″ circumference 37.68 x 3 (cake depth) 113.04
area 113.04 x 3 339.12
total area covered   with 2 layers ganache 452.16 E

 

A + B is the cakes you made with 1 layer of filling (288.88)

C+D+E is what you are going to make 6,9,12 with two layers of filling (869)

The total area of A +B is about one third of C+D+E so you would need approx 3 times your original recipe.

ps I hope you haven’t lost the will to live after reading this!

pps anyone feel free to correct my maths!

 

 

jayess
737

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